ARCHIVING YOUR THESIS

All students producing theses/dissertations in the School of Informatics are asked to produce an electronic archive of their write-ups (called "theses" in the following). These theses are an extremely valuable resource for other researchers and for students doing projects in the future. The electronic archive enables them to make a stronger contribution, building on work that has gone before, and appropriately putting their work in context and acknowledging previous contributions.

The list of archived MSC theses can be viewed at http://www.informatics.ed.ac.uk/publications/thesis/msc.html.

For this reason, as well as the paper copies that you submit to the ITO, you are asked to also submit a PDF document electronically.

There may be some people who have especially good reasons why their theses cannot or should not be made part of an electronic archive. Those people should ensure that their supervisor and the ITO know the special reasons.

You are asked to make an archive of your thesis in pdf format as follows:

1. Create the PDF file

Most word processing packages have the option to save a file as pdf, so generating your thesis in pdf format should be straightforward. For example, if you are using LaTeX, on a DICE machine you can use pdflatex to convert your thesis directly from latex to pdf as follows:

    $ pdflatex <thesis>.tex

This will produce a file <thesis>.pdf in the same directory.

Take care to ensure that all figures, tables and listings are correctly incorporated into the pdf file you plan to submit.

2. Archive the PDF

Use the online form to archive the PDF form of your thesis. You will need to specify the name of your PDF file on this web form.


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