Computer Security

INFR10067: Computer Security is a Level 10 course given in Semester 1 worth 20 credits. See the Course Catalogue entry.

Mondays12:10-13:00Lecture Theater 5, Appleton Tower
Tuesdays11:10-12:00H.R.B Lecture Theatre, Robson Building, Central
Thursdays10:00-10:50amG.07 Meadows Lecture Theatre - Doorway 4, Medical School, Teviot, Central

The course lecturers are Myrto Arapinis and Kami Vaniea

Lecture Slides

Slides will be added below as we go along. The slides from last year will give a good idea about what's coming up. Readings are optional. Unless otherwise noted, readings are from the recommended textbook Security In Computing.

1.    18 Sept. Introduction to the course
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 1.1: Fundamental Concepts
2. 19 Sept. Cyber Essentials and Threat Modeling
3. 21 Sept. Network and internet vulnerabilities
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 5: Network Security 1
4. 25 Sept. Network protections
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 6: Network Security 2
5. 26 Sept. Network and privacy
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 6: Network Security 2
6. 28 Sept. Network and privacy
7. 02 Oct. Cryptography - Stream ciphers
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.1.3: One-time pads
    • Chapter 8.1.4: Pseudo-random number generators
8. 03 Oct. Cryptography - Block ciphers
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.1.6: The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)
    • Chapter 8.1.7: Modes of operation
    • Chapter 8.5.1: Details for AES
9. 05 Oct. Cryptography - Hash functions and MACs
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.3: Cryptographic hash functions
10. 09 Oct. Cryptography - Hash functions and MACs
11. 10 Oct. Cryptography - Asymmetric encryption
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.3: Public-key cryptography
  • Additional reading:
    • Chapter 8.5.2: Details for RSA
12. 12 Oct. Cryptography - Asymmetric encryption
  • Finished prior lecture slides
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.3: Public-key cryptography
  • Additional reading:
    • Chapter 8.5.2: Details for RSA
13. 16 Oct. Cryptography - Digital signatures and PKI
  • Slides: PDF
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 8.4: Digital signatures
    • From Cryptography and Network Security - Principles and Practice, by William Stallings
      • Chapter 14.3 - Distribution of Public Keys
      • Chapter 14.4 - X.509 Certificates
      • Chapter 14.5 - Public Key Infrastructres
14. 17 Oct. Cryptographic protocols - Introduction
15. 19 Oct. Cryptographic protocols - More cryptographic protocols
16. 23 Oct. Usable Security
17. 24 Oct. Usable Security 2
18. 26 Oct. Authentication
19. 30 Oct. SSL/TLS
20. 31 Oct. Anonymity protocols
21. 02 Nov. Anonymity protocols
22. 06 Nov. Memory Safety
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 3.1: Operating Systems Concepts
23. 07 Nov. Memory Safety
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 3.4: Application Program Security
24. 09 Nov. Memory Safety
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 3.4: Application Program Security
25. 13 Nov. Web security: web basics
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 7.1: The World Wide Web
26. 14 Nov. Web security: server-side attacks
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 7.3: Attacks on servers
27. 16 Nov. Web security: server-side attacks
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 7.3: Attacks on servers
28. 20 Nov. Web security: client-side attacks
  • Slides: PDF
  • Reading:
    • Chapter 7.2: Attacks on clients

These are lecture slides, not comprehensive notes. You should supplement the slides with notes taken in lectures, and from your own reading. References and specific reading recommendations are given in slides, further guidance is given in lectures. The examinable material consists of what is covered in lectures, tutorials and practicals (unless specifically excluded) and the reading recommended in lectures.

Course resources

Tutorials and Labs


There are worksheets for the tutorials and labs which will be issued beforehand. You should try each worksheet before the tutorial meeting.

Tutorials are based on question sheets which you should use to help guide your own study for the course. Solutions will be issued a while after the question sheets so you can measure your progress. There is not enough time to cover all topics; you should aim to cover remaining topics to a similar depth of knowledge.

Coursework Exercises

There are two assessed coursework exercises, each worth 12.5% of the final mark.

Exams

  • Past papers are on the ITO pages.
    The only solutions available are those already published.
    Older exams include questions on "BAN logic" which has since been removed from the syllabus.



Documents above are in PDF format. Comments, suggestions, corrections are welcomed.
To print course materials, make sure your PDF reader has the correct page size and orientation.

Copyright: except where stated, lecture notes and other course materials are Copyright (C) School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, and respective authors. Lecture slides prepared by David Aspinall, Myrto Arapinis, and Kami Vaniea with additions by Mike Just and Julian Bradfield.
Please respect our rights over this material and contact us if you want to use it in another context.


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